Canyenne Civil War RElics


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CIVIL WAR SWORDS & BAYONETS

 



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Early War of 1812 Cavalry Saber by Nathan Starr

“ Here is a very historic sword, from the War of 1812. This is a huge cavalry saber manufactured by the famous firm of Nathan Starr, the first government contractor to manufacture a wide range of swords for the United States Military. This is a wide bladed sword without a fuller and bearing a fine clipped point. The blade is in excellent condition with a nice gray patina. The sword blade is beautifully marked with the “P” inspector mark meaning it had passed all tests and was “Proved” by the inspector Henry H. Perkin. Perkin’s initials, HHP, appear below the Proved mark. Below HHP is the manufacturer’s mark “N. Starr” for Nathan Starr. “P” also appears on the knuckle bow, indicating inspection as well. The leather has been worn off the wooden handle and there is no scabbard which is often the case with these old swords. According to Peterson’s sword book, these swords were part government’s order on March 14, 1812 and only 1,000 were manufactured before the government changed the requirements for the design of the hand guard. This is a very fine example of an important piece of early American Militaria by a famous maker."

SOLD


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Early War of 1812 Cavalry Saber by Nathan Starr

“ Here is a very historic sword, from the War of 1812. This is a huge cavalry saber manufactured by the famous firm of Nathan Starr, the first government contractor to manufacture a wide range of swords for the United States Military. This is a wide bladed sword without a fuller and bearing a fine clipped point. The blade is in excellent condition with a nice gray patina. The sword blade is beautifully marked with the “P” inspector mark meaning it had passed all tests and was “Proved” by the inspector Henry H. Perkin. Perkin’s initials, HHP, appear below the Proved mark. Below HHP is the manufacturer’s mark “N. Starr” for Nathan Starr. “P” also appears on the knuckle bow, indicating inspection as well. There are still traces of the original leather on the wooden handle but there is no scabbard which is often the case with these old swords. According to Peterson’s sword book, these swords were part government’s order on March 14, 1812 and only 1,000 were manufactured before the government changed the requirements for the design of the hand guard. This is a very fine example of an important piece of early American Militaria by a famous maker."

NSCAV-2 Price $595.00


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Early War of 1812 Cavalry Saber by Nathan Starr

“\Here is a very historic sword, from the War of 1812. This is a huge cavalry saber manufactured by the famous firm of Nathan Starr, the first government contractor to manufacture a wide range of swords and firearms for the United States Military. This is a wide bladed sword without a fuller and bearing a fine clipped point. The blade is in excellent condition with a nice gray patina. The sword blade is beautifully marked with the “P” inspector mark meaning it had passed all tests and was “Proved” by the inspector Henry H. Perkin. Perkin’s initials, HHP, appear below the Proved mark. Below HHP is the manufacturer’s mark “N. Starr” for Nathan Starr. There is also an “O” mark below the N.Starr name and I am unfamiliar with it’s meaning despite assiduous research. “P” also appears on the knuckle bow, indicating inspection as well. These swords bore leather covered wooden grips and a good amount of the leather remains. The sword is accompanied by an iron scabbard with an iron throat two iron carrying rings. According to “The American Sword, 1775 to 1945”, by Harold L. Petersen and “Nathan Starr, Arms Maker”, by James E. Hicks, these swords were part of the government’s order on March 14, 1812 for 5,000 sabers. Only 1,000 were manufactured before the government changed the requirements for the design of the hand guard, increasing it’s distance from the grip to the knuckle bow by 1/2 inch where the bow makes it’s right angle turn towards the grip for the remaining 4,000. The first 1,000 swords produced under this order had a leather scabbard the remaining production all had iron scabbards. On January 11, 1813 the government increased it’s order to 10,000 sabers. This is a very fine example of an important piece of early American Militaria by a famous maker.”

NSCAV-3 $650.00


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Early War of 1812 Cavalry Saber by Nathan Starr

“Here is a very historic sword, from the War of 1812. This is a huge cavalry saber manufactured by the famous firm of Nathan Starr, the first government contractor to manufacture a wide range of swords and firearms for the United States Military. This is a wide bladed sword without a fuller and bearing a fine clipped point. The blade is in excellent condition with a nice gray patina. The sword blade is beautifully marked with the “P” inspector mark meaning it had passed all tests and was “Proved” by the inspector Luther Sage. Sage’s initials, L.S., appear below the Proved mark. Below L.S. is the manufacturer’s mark “N. Starr” for Nathan Starr. There is also the Starr stamped “star" mark on the other side of the ricasso. I have never seen this mark on any other Nathan Starr 1812 sword and I have many in my personal collection. “P” also appears on the knuckle bow, indicating inspection as well. These swords bore leather covered wooden grips and the leather is MIA on this sword as is often the case. The sword is accompanied by an iron scabbard with an iron throat and two iron carrying rings. According to “The American Sword, 1775 to 1945”, by Harold L. Petersen and “Nathan Starr, Arms Maker”, by James E. Hicks, these swords were part of the government’s order on March 14, 1812 for 5,000 sabers. Only 1,000 were manufactured before the government changed the requirements for the design of the hand guard, increasing it’s distance from the grip to the knuckle bow by 1/2 inch where the bow makes it’s right angle turn towards the grip for the remaining 4,000. The first 1,000 swords produced under this order had a leather scabbard the remaining production all had iron scabbards. On January 11, 1813 the government increased it’s order to 10,000 sabers. This is a very fine example of an important piece of early American Militaria by a famous maker with a rare Starr mark.”

NSCAV-4 $650.00


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Model 1818 Starr Cavalry Saber

“On December 28, 1818 the U.S. Ordnance Department signed a contract with Nathan Starr for the delivery of 10,000 Cavalry Sabers. Since there was no cavalry in the Regular Army at that time these sabers were all intended for arming the militia of the various states. These swords were completed and delivered between 1820 and 1822. These swords differ from the earlier 1812 contract in that they are not as massive and have a distinct fuller. The blade ends in a clipped point. The knuckle bow has a slot for a sword knot as does the Model 1812 swords. The wooden grip was covered with leather and only minute traces exist on this example. The blade is stamped near the hilt: U.S./ P (for proved)/ L.S. (Luther Sage, Inspector)/ N. Starr (manufacturer). This sword originally had an iron scabbard with two rings but it has been lost to the ages. Many of these swords, both the Model 1812 and the 1818 models were carried by soldiers of both sides in the Civil War as period photographs show."

NSCAV-5 SOLD


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Model 1818 Starr Cavalry Saber

“On December 28, 1818 the U.S. Ordnance Department signed a contract with Nathan Starr for the delivery of 10,000 Cavalry Sabers. Since there was no cavalry in the Regular Army at that time these sabers were all intended for arming the militia of the various states. These swords were completed and delivered between 1820 and 1822. These swords differ from the earlier 1812 contract in that they are not as massive and have a distinct fuller. The blade ends in a clipped point. The knuckle bow has a slot for a sword knot as does the Model 1812 swords. The wooden grip was covered with leather and a substantial amount remains on this example. The blade is stamped near the hilt: U.S./ P (for proved)/ L.S. (Luther Sage, Inspector)/ N. Starr (manufacturer). This sword is equipped with it’s iron scabbard with two rings. Many of these swords, both the Model 1812 and the 1818 models were carried by soldiers of both sides in the Civil War as period photographs show.

NSCAV-6 $575.00


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Model 1818 N.C.O. Infantry Sword

This is a tough to find sword! On December 28, 1818 the Ordnance Department also contracted with Nathan Starr for the manufacture of 4,000 infantry swords intended for use by N.C.O.’s. These swords were to have leather covered handles and iron scabbards. The blade was straight with a fuller and the knuckle bow had a slot for a sword knot. The scabbard had a distinctive stud mounted on a diamond shaped piece of iron and was intended to fit in a leather frog which would attach to the belt. This example is missing the scabbard as is often the case with these scarce swords. The blade on this one is a nice plum brown, the wooden handle is undamaged but the leather wrapping is missing on this 201 year old sword, which is not uncommon. The blade is nicely marked with the following: N. Starr/ U.S./ P (for proved) and E.T. ( for the inspector, Elisha Toby) This is a fine piece of American Mikitary History in a sowrd that is tough to find at a reasonable price.

NSNCO-7 $625.00


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Model 1818 N.C.O. Infantry Sword

This is a tough to find sword! On December 28, 1818 the Ordnance Department also contracted with Nathan Starr for the manufacture of 4,000 infantry swords intended for use by N.C.O.’s. These swords were to have leather covered handles and iron scabbards. The blade was straight with a fuller and the knuckle bow had a slot for a sword knot. The scabbard had a distinctive stud mounted on a diamond shaped piece of iron and was intended to fit in a leather frog which would attach to the belt. The scabbard is present on this example. The blade on this one is bright and a substantial amount of the leather is present on the wooden grip. The blade is nicely marked with the following: N. Starr/ U.S./ P (for proved) and L.S. ( for the inspector, Luther Sage) This is a fine piece of American Military History in a sword that is tough to find with the scabbard present at a reasonable price.

NSNCO-8 $750.00


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Model 1840 Ames Cavalry Saber Dated 1856

Here is a hard to find sword. A pre-war Model 1840 heavy cavalry saber by the famous Ames Sword company. Also known as the “wrist breaker”, due to it’s weight, this was a fearsome sword. This very fine piece and nicely marked. It is dated 1856 and is marked on one side of the ricasso with strong stamping: Ames Mfg. Co/ Chicopee/ Mass./1856. The opposite side is marked with the Ordnance Department acceptance mark and inspector’s initials: U.S. /A.D.K. ( Andrew D. King) The throat washer is present on this fine old sword but the original leather wrap with twisted wire that covered the wooden grip is M.I.A. as is often the case with these early swords which saw very heavy duty. The blade is in fine condition as is the brass hand guard. A fine early Ames sword to add to any collection.

SOLD