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NEWLY LISTED RELICS



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RIF-10 A must have addition for any serious Confederate weapons collector. A very rare Dickson, Nelson & Co. rifle Manufactured in Dawson, Georgia in 1865 for the State of Alabama and so stamped on the lockplate. Alabama contracted with Dickson, Nelson and Co. for 5,000 weapons based on the U.S. Model 1841 Mississippi rifle but only 645 were delivered. This is one of those weapons and very few exist. The rifle is considered the “Holy Grail” of Confederate rifles as well as one of the best if not the best made of all C.S. percussion rifles. As Dennis Adler notes on page 219 in his book, “Guns of the Civil War” , Dickson, Nelson & Company ……"was literally a company on the move . Organized in 1861 to supply arms to the Confederacy, the factory was going to set up in Dickson, Alabama but as the tide of the war changed a hasty move was made to Rome, Georgia. That facility was burned to the ground forcing them to move to Adairsville, Georgia…..they remained in Adairsville up until the Battle of Chicamauga in September 1863 at which time a hasty retreat with as much machinery as possible was made to Dawson, Georgia for the remainder of the war. Originally named the Shakanoosa Arms Company…..Despite having to relocate several times , the company managed to supply the Confederacy with over 3,500 rifles and carbines.” (It should be noted the gun is so rare Adler was unable to obtain one to photograph for his heavily illustrated work.)

The rifle is one of the 3,500 weapons produced by Dickson, Nelson & Co. and one of 645 for the State of Alabama. It is a .58 caliber percussion rifle and the design is based on the U.S. Model 1842 and Model 1855 patterns combining features from both. The brass buttplate, triggerguard, barrel bands and nosecap have mellowed to a beautiful mustard yellow. The lock, barrel and original ramrod are a nice overall dove gray. The sight is present and note the line on the barrel for lining it up for correct sighting. The mechanics are perfect with the hammer holding in both half cock and full cock positions. The lockplate forward of the hammer bears the inscription: "Dickson, Nelson & Co. / C.S." Behind the hammer is the Inscription"Ala. / 1865.” The wood is a beautiful dark walnut with no splits or cracks. On the forward left side of the rifle, there is evidence of a long ago, small repair just behind the nosecap between it and the rifle’s first brass band as pictured. The breech shows minimal peppering from use. This is a very fine and extremely rare piece for a collector wishing to add an outstanding Confederate rifle to his collection. $35,000.00



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RINavaja-1 This is a very nice example of an 1800’s Spanish Navaja or fighting knife from an old Mobile weapons collection. It bears bone scales with inlaid brass, brass pins and brass bolsters. The overall length is 19 7/8 inches with a 9 1/8 inch blade. Both sides of the balde are engraved with one side reading “No me sacas sin razon” or "Do not draw me without reason”.The blade is locked in place when opened by an extremely strong spring that prevents the blade from closing on the fingers. The word Navaja comes from the Spanish word for razor and these knives were indeed kept razor sharp. The Navaja came into existence in Spain during the 16th century after the carrying of swords was outlawed, prompting some enterprising individual to invent the folding “pocket sword.” These are known to have been used in duels and as last ditch back up weapons by soldiers. They were so popular that even a "Navaja Manual" was written describing their best tactical use in a knife fight. In a hostile encounter, a sash or cape was often wrapped on the left arm to parry an opponent’s blade preventing injury to the left arm and allowing a thrust by the right hand. A very nice weapon to add to any knife collection. Price $595.00



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RIDK-1 A WWI Hard Hat Diver’s Knife from and old Mobile collection. A very heavy piece that screws into its weighty brass scabbard. A nice collectable if you like diving. $475.00



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RIDK-2 Another WWI era diver’s knife with a heavy brass scabbard fro an [old Mobile collection. The knife is double edged, with a turned wooden handle like many of these diver’s knives of the period and has a name on it. The last name is Gorman but I cannot make out the first name. Perhaps the owner or the manufacturer? $425.00



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RIS-5 Beautifully detailed Eagle Pommel Militia Sword with a fluted bone handle. The bone handle is in perfect condition with no cracks or chips. Blade has no Maker’s mark. Point of the blade is very sharp with no damage. The scabbard is in excellent condition with a nicely detailed drag and both rings present. This would have belonged to an officer in a State Militia Unit and carried off to war. $500.00



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RIS-6 This unique piece is a model 1833 French artillery sword and scabbard that has been cut down to fighting knife length. I have never seen another like it. This piece screams C.S. usage and is from an old Mobile collection. Many of these Artillery swords were purchased in Europe as surplus for use in the Civil War. Originally designed in 1816, The U.S. Model 1832 Ames Artillery models and the C.S. Artillery models were patterned after them. $1,100.00



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RIS-7 Hunting Sword. This is a beautifully crafted early 1800’s European Hunting Sword and scabbard. These single handed short swords date back to the 12th century but were used during hunting parties by Europeans from the 17th to the 19th century. A hunting sword was usually used to finish off game rather than waste another shot and were also worn by some military as a sign of rank. Hunting swords come in a great variety of designs and with the beautifully crafted clam shell hand guard, swirled pommel, wire grip and embossed blade this is one of the nicer ones. Price $350.00



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RJI-Cannon - A beautifully handcrafted bronze Lantaka cannon. This was a portable cannon or swivel gun that was mounted on merchant vessels and warships in Maritime Southeast Asia. Lantaka cannons were used by Moro soldiers in the Moro Rebellion against U.S. Soldiers in the Philippines. They were also used by the Filipinos during the Philippine Revolution. They were copied from European mode;s and cast from church bells. At sea the cannons were mounted in sockets on the ship’s rail, on land they were mounted on wooden bases and carried from position to position much like a modern day mortar. The bore on this cannon is 1.36 inches. A beautiful piece to be displayed with a gun collection or mounted as a centerpiece in as garden. $2100.00



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RJI-Tomahawk - From an old Mobile collection, this is a very fine Native American tomahawk from the 1800’s. It is decorated with deer fur and a string of blue beads and the handle is wrapped with rawhide. This would have been a vicious weapon in hand to hand combat with a cutting blade and a spike to pierce the skull. A fine addition to any Native American collection. $3,000.00



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RJI-RootClub - From an Old Mobile collection, this is a very unusual Native American Root Club. It resembles a horned boar or pig, with rudimentary carved eyes and mouth. The shaft has a carved leaf design. In my opinion this would have belonged to a tribal Shaman to use in rituals. A very fine Native American Piece to display with any collection of Indian Artifacts. $2,000.00



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RISB-11 From an old Mobile collection, a Type No.1 sword bayonet with a Yataghan blade for the Model 1855 Colt Revolving Rifle as described in Hardin’s, “The American Bayonet” page 106 #81. ( see photo) The upper iron guard through which the barrel passes has the distinctive pinched cockscomb with the lower guard terminating in a rearward-curving disk finial. The blade is in excellent condition as is the metal scabbard. The stud spring is fully functional and the number “146” is visible on the bird’s head next to the spring button. The blade bears the manufacturer's mark “S&K” for Schnitzler & Kirschbaum of Solingen Germany (1811-1864) As Hardin notes, “Colt contracted abroad for many of his arms during various periods of his career. The bayonets for this rifle were no exception.” According to Hardin this same bayonet was used on Colt’s Artillery Carbine. Price $800.00



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RITS-12 Two unique relics from an old Mobile collection. These are two toy swords made during the Civil War. As you can see one concerned parent apparently blunted the end of one. These are very nicely made pieces. The replica of an Officer’s Model 1860 Cavalry saber still has the leather covering on the wooden grip. Both handguards were heavily gilded at one time and still retain a large amount of gilt. The sword with the blunted end is 22’ from pommel to tip and the other is 18 1/2” from pommel to tip. Priced as a pair: $500.00



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RIMISC-13 A beautifully crafted Lady’s Victorian Riding Crop. The fittings are gold plated and the handle appears to be Ivory. The wooden shaft is carved in a manner to imitate bamboo.The owner’s name, “Lily Parkin” is engraved on the ferrule below the handle. From an old Mobile collection. Price $250.00



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MR-14b A world War 1 British Officer’s Swagger stick from The Royal Berkshire Regiment. 25 1/2 inches long and a very nice piece in excellent condition. Price $150.00



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MISC-15 W.W. I American Officer’s Swagger Stick identified to Capt. W.B. Marshall, 0-363617 of the 26th Field Artillery Regiment. First constituted on July 5, 1918 it has had a long and glorious history. The top cap bears the Regiment’s Distinctive Unit Insignia and the 26th Artillery Regiment Crossed cannons decorate the side of the cap. Capt. Marshall’s name and serial number are engraved as well along the side. The top appears to be sterling or heavy silverplate but is not marked as such. The tip of the stick is rather unique with a .45 ACP cartridge dated 1917 affixed to the oak shaft. A very nice piece with provenance to the officer who carried it. A very nice research project. Price $350.00



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RIK-16 From WWI a Model 1917 Landers, Frary & Clark Trench Knife with its original leather and metal scabbard. This is a vicious weapon. The triangular blade was designed to be able to punch through the heavy felt trench coats worn by the enemy and the pyramidal knobs on the hand guard served as a brutal “knuckle duster”. The walnut handle with finger grips is in excellent condition, the blade is perfect. markings “U.S. L.F. & C. 1917” are crisp and scabbard is in very good condition. Price $750.00



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RIF-8 A high quality example of a Model 1841 U.S. Percussion Rifle dated 1849, also known as the “Mississippi Rifle” . It is regarded by many collectors as one of the most handsome of all U.S. Military longarms. This is a Robbins and Lawrence contract model made in Windsor, Vermont as indicated by the very strong markings on the lockplate. The rifle was produced by Robbins and Lawrence from 1848 to 1853 with a total production of 15,000. It is .54 caliber, has an excellent bore, perfect mechanics, both sling swivels present and original Ramrod. There is slight peppering on the breech indicating use, the metal is a nice plum tone with traces of bluing towards the bore. The rifle got it's “Mississippi” name during the Mexican War when a regiment under the command of Jefferson Davis of Mississippi used them with precision against the Mexican Army. These rifles stand out due to their brass furniture including a brass trigger guard, barrel bands, lock bolster, buttplate and patchbox. Note the inside lid of the patchbox contains the initials M.L.P. punched into the brass. All of the brass on this piece have mellowed to a nice mustard tone.The walnut stock is in excellent condition and the two inspector cartouches opposite the lock are very strong. These indicate the rifle was approved for military use. This is an excellent example of a Mississippi that would be very tough to upgrade. $3,900.00

SOLD


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RIF-9 Model 1884 U.S. Springfield Trap Door Rifle with Buffington rear sight, .45-70. Has the standard two piece trigger guard and grooved trigger associated with this rifle. Both sling swivels present and stacking swivel. Correct ramrod. Sight in excellent condition, rifle nicely marked and dated. The wood is in very nice condition as is the metal. Strong markings on lock, Trapdoor, buttplate and serial number present just above the tang. The Model 1884 was used in the Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, Phillipine-American War. A very fine addition to any U.S. Springfield or U.S. Military rifle collection. $1,500.00 SOLD



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RIS-1 Beautifully detailed Eagle Pommel Militia Sword with a fluted bone handle. The bone handle is in perfect condition with no cracks or chips. Blade has no maker’s mark. Point of the blade is needle sharp with no damage. The scabbard is in very good condition with a nicely detailed drag. This would have belonged to a well to do officer in a State Militia Unit. $500.00



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RIS-2 This is a very unusual piece. A Model 1840 Wrist Breaker Cavalry Sword that has had the blade and scabbard professionally shortened. Perhaps for a short Cavalryman? It is shown for comparison next to a Regulation Model 1840 for comparison. The overall length of sword in scabbard is 34 1/2 inches. The blade is 27 3/4 inches whereas a normal 1840 blade would be 35 1/2 inches. There is no maker’s mark on ricasso. Original leather wrap and wire is present. Whoever shortened the blade and scabbard did a first class job! Unusual piece that would be a real conversation piece in any Civil War collection $850.00



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RIS-3 This is a Model 1860 Ames Cavalry Saber with a late war 1865 date. The pommel bears the sub inspector mark A.D.K for Andrew Dennision King who inspected U.S. weapons from 1850 to 1865 and was assigned to the Ames plant in 1861. The ricasso bears the inspector’s mark G.K.C. for George K. Charter along with the U.S. stamp and the 1865 production date. The reverse of the ricasso bears the Ames scroll logo. The blade has a nice plum color, the edge is in excellent condition with only one tiny flea bite about 10 inches back from the tip and the leather washer is present. The grip still has the original leather but it is worn through in places and the wire wrap is complete. An added bonus is one of the leather sword hangers is present with two nicely aged brass sword rivets like those we often dig in the relic fields. This sword appears to have seen long service and likely went on to the western frontier in the Indian wars. Interestingly, the top of the quillion is bent forward. This is seen on some cavalry sabers and it has been suggested this was to “trap” the blade of an opponent much like the hooked quillions on some bayonets. There is a very slight movement in the handguard. A fine old sword that “Saw the Elephant” $750.00



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RIS-4 Model 1861 U.S. Naval Cutlass manufactured by Ames Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Mass. accompanied by it’s leather scabbard. From July of 1861 through December of 1864 Ames delivered 22,000 of these cutlasses to the Bureau of Naval Ordnance.The swords were dated 1861, 1862 and 1864. The date on this one is worn but appears to be 1862. The Ames logo is also worn but the remainder of the word “Chicoppe” is just barely visible under magnification. The rack number “10M 425” is stamped on the quillion. The hand guard basket has a few expected bumps and bruises but no cracks or breaks. The scabbard is a plus but the leather has shrunk over time leaving the sword 1/2 inch shy of full insertion. The handle has the original leather but the wire has been removed and handle appears to be coated with a thin layer of tar which was a common practice aboard Naval Ships. A fine example for any Civil War Naval Collection $995.00



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RIF-5 The Consignor has had this very interesting piece in his Civil War C.S. collection for many years. It was originally a British Rail Gun used on English War Ships as a signal cannon. It is a .91 caliber cannon, 12 1/4 inches long and measures 3 3/4 wide at the trunnions. The gun is crudely embedded and bolted into a wooden log with an iron handle at the rear for carrying it while grasping the muzzle. The log is painted a blue/gray color with traces of white and green paint showing through in places. It is clearly a very old piece. Very interestingly, the fuse hole has had a percussion nipple affixed that would allow for the use of percussion caps to fire the gun. Upon purchase, the consignor will provide a detailed signed letter with the piece which states in part, “…..the Confederate Army purchased surplus English Weapons such as this during the early parts of the Civil War, before most ports of entry were closed. This cannon would have been the type of weapon the Confederates purchased. As they required weapons for land warfare, the intricate embedding of this cannon into the hand hewn log would have been a Confederate creation in order to convert the former English Maritime signal cannon into an anti-personnel land weapon. This weapon would then have been used by Confederate soldiers on breastworks for defensive purposes to expose the enemy to well aimed shot or single round balls at close range.” It may not has been effective as a two man Coehorn mortar but I bet it could have done a bit of damage and was much easier to to tote around! This is certainly and old an unique piece and is priced at $9,000.00



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RIF-6 Model 1867 New Model .50 Caliber Spencer rifle with the N.M. (New Model) designation at the breech. Both sling swivels are in place and there is a lug under the front of the barrel for a saber bayonet. The action operates smoothly, the bore is excellent with six groove rifling, sight if fully functional and the magazine is in perfect condition. This rifle is from an old Mobile Collection and is museum quality. $4,500.00 SOLD



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RIF-7 .50-70 Metallic cartridge conversion of a Model 1863 Sharps Saddle Ring Percussion Carbine. Very good condition with crisp marking of lock plate and sight. Rear sight is fully functional and front blade is perfect. The action is very smooth and the lever lock functions flawlessly. Saddle ring and bar present. Bore is very good with mirror like finish. Walnut stock and forearm in very good condition. A great Indian Wars piece! $3700.00 SOLD


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